Learn Robotics Programming: Build and control autonomous robots using Raspberry Pi 3 and Python

Price: (as of – Details) Danny Staple builds robots and gadgets as a hobbyist, makes videos about his work with robots, and attends community events such as PiWars and Arduino Day. He has been a professional Python programmer, later moving into DevOps, since 2009, and a software engineer since 2000. He has worked with embedded systems, including embedded Linux systems, throughout the majority of his career. He has been a mentor at a local CoderDojo, where he taught how to code with Python. He has run Lego Robotics clubs with Mindstorms. He has also developed Bounce!, a visual programming language

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Learning RSLogix 5000 Programming: Building PLC solutions with Rockwell Automation and RSLogix 5000

Price: (as of – Details) Austin Scott founded Synergist SCADA in 2006, a successful company that provides vendor-neutral SCADA architecture and development. Synergist has also developed a suite of engineering tools, including Citect Power Tools and Active Network Security. In July 2013, Synergist was acquired by Cimation as the catalyst for its growing Canadian operations and ongoing product development.With more than a decade of industrial automation and software development experience, Austin has worked on large-scale, high-profile projects across North America and around the globe, incorporating most major SCADA platforms. His professional focus includes developing and refining custom software solutions to

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Programming the Raspberry Pi, Second Edition: Getting Started with Python

Price: (as of – Details) Dr. Simon Monk has a bachelor’s degree in cybernetics and computer science and a Ph.D. in software engineering. He is now a full-time writer and has authored numerous books, including Programming Arduino, 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius, Hacking Electronics, and Fritzing for Inventors. Dr. Monk also runs the website monk.makes.com, which features his own products.

Coding for Kids: Python: Learn to Code with 50 Awesome Games and Activities

Price: (as of – Details) “Python is a really powerful programming language with very simple and human-like syntax. Thanks to these advantages and the interactive exercises and games in Coding for Kids: Python, everyone—regardless of age—will be able to understand the power of the language and start using it immediately. I really can’t wait to use some of these examples in our school!”—Marcin Zajkowski, Co-owner of WOW School

Go Programming Cookbook: Over 85 recipes to build modular, readable, and testable Golang applications across various domains, 2nd Edition

Price: (as of – Details) Aaron Torres received his master’s degree in computer science from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. He has worked on distributed systems in high-performance computing and in large-scale web and microservices applications. He currently leads a team of Go developers that refines and focuses on Go best practices with an emphasis on continuous delivery and automated testing.Aaron has published a number of papers and has several patents in the area of storage and I/O. He is passionate about sharing his knowledge and ideas with others. He is also a huge fan of the

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Coding for Kids: Scratch: Learn Coding Skills, Create 10 Fun Games, and Master Scratch

Price: (as of – Details) “Coding for Kids: Scratch is a well-organized and playful book to introduce any reader to Scratch! From the thorough and visual instructions to the readily available Scratch recipes to build upon, this book instructs, inspires, and delights every step of the way.”―Adrienne Braganza Tacke, author of Coding for Kids: Python

Baby Loves Coding! (Baby Loves Science)

Price: (as of – Details) A baby with big eyes, dressed as an engineer, plays with a colorful toy train set. When Baby sees that the red car is missing from the track and spies it in the toy box, she takes “Three steps to the right, three steps forward, and three steps to the left. Then baby takes three steps all by herself.” Each time Baby walks to the toy box, Spiro explains, it’s the same pattern—and that pattern is called an algorithm. The train, specifically the tiny computer in its engine, also follows an algorithm, this one created

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